Author Topic: ST1300 dash backlight upgrade using kit from LightenUpgrade  (Read 388 times)

Offline CallMeSteve

  • STrudel, Steve and Ruth.
  • Legendary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 582
  • Thanked: 301 times
  • Eatons Hill, Brisbane.
ST1300 dash backlight upgrade using kit from LightenUpgrade
« on: December 08, 2020, 05:18:16 PM »
Here is a link to the kit I purchased, using white LEDs. 

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/led-clock-upgrade-kit-lightenUPgrade-WHITE-HONDA-ST1300-pan-european/152335382541?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2648

The LEDs themselves are 3mm SMDs that you could theoretically buy a little cheaper from somewhere like RS, but if you get the kit you'll save yourself pouring over LED specs, and probably get them sooner too.  Mark is super helpful, and his kit includes very good instructions, an ample supply of nice bright LEDs and also a replacement diffuser card.  Just support Mark and buy the kit.

Mark has gone to considerable effort in putting together a very good set of instructions for the ST1300 (and has considerably refined his instructions over the last few years), so to protect his IP I have decided not to repeat it here.  But what I will say is that getting the dash out is trivial.  Remove the windscreen, then remove the black trim that sits under it (by gently sliding it up over the arms that hold the screen), then undo 6 bolts to get the dash out.  From a standing start and with no advance knowledge, I had the circuit boards out in less than 90 minutes.  Some have said that you need to pull off a heap of Tupperware to get the dash out. It's just not true.

While I'm not going to give a full step-by-step I will unload a few pointers at the circuit board level that might be helpful without making redundant the very good information provided with the kit.

Apart from the obvious Philips head driver and sockets for getting the dash out, you will need:
- A temperature-controlled soldering iron (about $70 from Jaycar).  Do not use the simpler uncontrolled ones. They are fine for soldering wires but they will likely fry the LEDs with too much heat.
- Get a very fine tip to go with your iron because the LEDs are very small. I used a 0.5mm tip.
- A solder sucker or desoldering braid (also from Jaycar)
- A small desktop circuit board holder ($25 from Jaycar)
- A kitchen fork or some similar weapon to lever off the tacho and speedo needles.
- A pair of square-nosed pliers to bend back the metal tabs that hold the LCD module onto the PC board.
- Very fine tweezers for handling the SMD LEDs
- Circuit board cleaner or Isopropyl alcohol.
- Whatever optical accessories you need to give you clear vision at just a few inches. I tried using Ruth's illuminated magnifier, but I rejected it in favour of a simple set of +3 reading glasses.
- An anti-static mat and strap is not a bad idea. (Thanks Brock).

Brock has rightly pointed out the benefit of anti-static gear. Personally I can be a bit cavalier about this. In a dry indoor air-conditioned environment with carpet or vinyl flooring this is an absolute must, but I've always felt that a 'shed' environment - concrete floor with a bit of humidity, combined with some sort of absorbent material on the bench (cloth or paper), makes static buildup a non-issue.  I'll leave you to decide.

Once you've got the dash out you will want to unplug the three connections shown below.  Then you can remove the dial assembly and the smaller assembly containing the ST1300 logo.  You don't need to remove the headlight leveller and the pushbuttons on the left.






The needles are a -very- tight press fit onto the respective shafts.  To remove them without damaging the face you could use a flat card and a fork to pry the needle off the shaft.



Eventually you'll be down to the two circuit boards


Install the circuit board in the board holder. This will hold the board still while you are working. This process is fiddly enough without also having the board wobbling around.


The LEDs are tiny:


A note on soldering: Do not use an iron any hotter than is necessary to cleanly melt the solder.  The white LEDs are quite easily damaged by overheating. I suggest using old-fashioned tin-lead solder rather than the newer lead-free solder just because it melts at a lower temperature.  About 250 Celsius on the soldering iron seems to work well.

LEDs are polarity sensitive, and they will not work if you install them backwards. There is a little triangular notch in one corner which matches with a triangular mark on the board.
Ironically, the OEM orange LEDs are white, and the new white LEDs are yellow.

Here's a short video that shows how to go about replacing the LEDs. I'm not the world's tidiest solderer but you'll get the idea.
https://photos.smugmug.com/Posting/i-dKPmwcV/0/fe24f206/1920/New%20video_mp4-1920.mp4

Replace just one LED first as a test, and then plug the board into the bike to check that the new LED lights. The difference in brightness will be stunning. If that's OK you'll have the confidence to continue.

<edit 12-JAN-2021 8am: The following paragraph and image has been updated to reflect the comments made by Biggles regarding the red LEDs that light the speedo and tacho needles>

Note that the 35 LEDs to be replaced are all labelled on the board as 'YELLOW'. There are other LEDs of various colours that perform other functions - you don't want to touch these. I suggest that you do not remove and replace all 35 LEDs at once.  Most of them are connected in pairs, in series (i.e. head-to-tail). This means that current flows first through one LED, and then through its mate. If either LED is faulty or incorrectly installed then both LEDs will fail to light, and it may be hard to figure out which of the two LEDs is the culprit.  Therefore I suggest that you replace the RED circled LEDs first, then check that they all light, and then replace the BLUE circled LEDs.  or the other way around - it doesn't matter whether you do the REDs or the BLUEs first. Then check again that all LEDs light.


You should remove the flux (the brown stuff) around the LEDs as it can have long-term effects if you leave it.  You can do this with either proper circuit board cleaner for even just Isopropyl alcohol.  Spray it on liberally, use a small toothbrush to lightly brush the area, and then a final good hefty squirt to rinse. Dab it dry or let it dry naturally.

Replace the orange diffuser filter with the new one supplied in the kit. Re-assemble the diffuser to the LCD panel and re-attach to the circuit board, twisting the metal tabs on the back to secure it in place.  Plug the board back into the bike again and verify that the LCD displays correctly.

<edit 12-JAN-2021 8am: The photo below shows that I mistakenly replaced the red LEDs that light the speedo and tacho needles, but I'm not about to go back and fix that.>


Now you can start re-assembly in reverse order.

Once you have re-attached the black front panel with its 4 black screws you will reattach the tacho and speedo needles, and you want to make sure they are correctly aligned. One method is to power up the board, at which time the shafts will rotate to the zero position. Then very loosely position the needle so that it sits on the shaft and also sits up against the zero stop, and then push down to secure it on the shaft. Finally give each needle a spin to ensure that it rotates fully without fouling.

<edit 13-DEC-2020 2pm: this method resulted in the speedo and techo reading quite wrong. See my follow up post for the process I used to correct them>

The rest of the re-assembly should be trivial.

Enjoy your new dash.  Here is it indoors:


And here it is in full afternoon sun:


Let me know if you spot anything that I should add or change.

Finally, for anyone in my general area I'm very happy to help with this.


« Last Edit: January 12, 2021, 08:01:39 AM by CallMeSteve »
A man rides on his STeed, says “Why am I short of attention? Got a short little span of attention”.

You can call me Steve, with apologies to Paul Simon.

 :wht13

current:
ST1300 2014 Police

pre-kids:
CX500
CB900
CB400NB
CB350
1964 Yamaha YG-1 80cc

IBA #76608,  FR #1170
 
The following users thanked this post: Biggles, Shiney, Jdbiker, ruSTynutz

Offline Brock

  • Tardis Tech
  • Global Moderator
  • UNBELIEVABLE "5000 Posts" Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8113
  • Thanked: 1253 times
  • White is Best
Re: ST1300 dash backlight upgrade using kit from LightenUpgrade
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2020, 05:33:29 PM »
Its a good idea to use an antistatic wrist strap when soldering in the LEDs, connected to a grounding point on your Temp controlled iron. It will stop blowing any static sensitive devices on the board.

Now back to  you regular program.

Brock
Asian Correspondent
2003 Honda ST1100PY



Ulysses #32829
STOC #8239
OzSToc # ??
Kinross WA
 
The following users thanked this post: CallMeSteve, ruSTynutz

Offline CallMeSteve

  • STrudel, Steve and Ruth.
  • Legendary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 582
  • Thanked: 301 times
  • Eatons Hill, Brisbane.
Re: ST1300 dash backlight upgrade using kit from LightenUpgrade
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2020, 10:06:00 AM »
The original post has been completed.  Do let me know of anything I should change.
A man rides on his STeed, says “Why am I short of attention? Got a short little span of attention”.

You can call me Steve, with apologies to Paul Simon.

 :wht13

current:
ST1300 2014 Police

pre-kids:
CX500
CB900
CB400NB
CB350
1964 Yamaha YG-1 80cc

IBA #76608,  FR #1170
 
The following users thanked this post: ruSTynutz

Offline Biggles

  • NatRally 2018 - Mackay
  • "Top Dog" 10000 club
  • *
  • Posts: 13524
  • Thanked: 1960 times
  • Bridgeman Downs, Brisbane
Re: ST1300 dash backlight upgrade using kit from LightenUpgrade
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2020, 10:18:54 PM »
Looks doable for an average klutz like me.  About how long to do the job?  And how long did it take for the kit to arrive from the UK?
For the modern man who lives in the city, riding a bike might be one of the only ways to escape the humdrum monotony. To take off and ride. To be both at one with nature and one with the bike. To feel masculine. Adam Piggott

OzSTOC #16  STOC #6135  FarR #509  IBA #54927
 

Offline CallMeSteve

  • STrudel, Steve and Ruth.
  • Legendary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 582
  • Thanked: 301 times
  • Eatons Hill, Brisbane.
Re: ST1300 dash backlight upgrade using kit from LightenUpgrade
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2020, 10:23:57 PM »
90 mins to dismantle, a couple of hours to do the LED swap, 90 mins to reassemble, plus some stuff-around time. You could be done in a day. It was quicker and easier than I expected.

The kit is delivered via eBay’s global freight service and in my case arrived in 10 days.
A man rides on his STeed, says “Why am I short of attention? Got a short little span of attention”.

You can call me Steve, with apologies to Paul Simon.

 :wht13

current:
ST1300 2014 Police

pre-kids:
CX500
CB900
CB400NB
CB350
1964 Yamaha YG-1 80cc

IBA #76608,  FR #1170
 
The following users thanked this post: Biggles, richo, ruSTynutz

Offline CallMeSteve

  • STrudel, Steve and Ruth.
  • Legendary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 582
  • Thanked: 301 times
  • Eatons Hill, Brisbane.
Re: ST1300 dash backlight upgrade using kit from LightenUpgrade
« Reply #5 on: December 13, 2020, 02:02:28 PM »
Just a bit of an update regarding the re-assembly of the speedo and tacho needles onto their respective shafts.

The procedure I quoted above (power up the dash to rotate the shafts to the zero position, then push the needles on so they butt snugly up against the left side of the stop) does not work. Well it didn't work for me anyway. First ride on the bike I noticed that the speedo was reading high - when the GPS indicated 100kph the speedo was showing 112.  STrudel has always read about 5kph high, so this did not please me at all.

This is the process I used to get it right:

First, note the speedo error at your chosen speed.  In my case 100 GPS = 112 indicated. I reckon that having the speedo read about +2 would be pretty optimal, so in other words I wanted to drop it back by 10kph at the chosen speed.

Back home, pull the dash out again, remove the front cover so the needles are accessible, and plug it back into the bike.

With the bike in a location that will not result in build-up of fumes, put the bike on the centre stand and ensure the rear wheel is well clear of the ground. Start the engine, snick it into top gear, and carefully raise the revs until the speedo is reading close to the indicated speed you noted earlier. Take a photo (or have someone do it for you) of the dash to record the positions of the tacho and speedo needles.



You might want to adjust the revs slightly for the photo so the tacho needle sits neatly on one of the graduations. This will make it easier to reliably return to the same revs.

Shut down the bike, pop off the speedo needle and take a wild guess at what the correct 'zero' position for the needle should be. Power up the dash to reset the shafts to the zero position , and then push on the needle onto the shaft at your guessed position. This will most likely to the right of the stop, so you will need to power off the dash again and rotate the needle back to the left side of the stop.

Start the engine, bring the revs up to the exact revs that you previously photographed, and compare the speedo against the photographed reading. If the new reading differs from the photographed reading by the amount you wanted to correct, then you are done.  It probably wont be, so repeat the process of repositioning the needle on the shaft until you get the result you want.

Once you are happy with the speedo you might want to try and correct the tacho. Unless you have access to an instrument that reads out the true engine rpm, you'll need to rely on your memory of where the tacho normally sits at a particular road speed.

Finally, reassemble the dash and take it for a test run to check the speedo against your GPS.

I was pleased and rather surprised to find that my speedo now reads a constant +2 all the way from 40k through to 110k.

In my case, the correct 'zero' position for both needles turned out to be just touching the right side of the stops, as shown below. I don't know whether others will find the same though.


« Last Edit: December 13, 2020, 02:08:59 PM by CallMeSteve »
A man rides on his STeed, says “Why am I short of attention? Got a short little span of attention”.

You can call me Steve, with apologies to Paul Simon.

 :wht13

current:
ST1300 2014 Police

pre-kids:
CX500
CB900
CB400NB
CB350
1964 Yamaha YG-1 80cc

IBA #76608,  FR #1170
 
The following users thanked this post: Jdbiker, ruSTynutz

Offline Biggles

  • NatRally 2018 - Mackay
  • "Top Dog" 10000 club
  • *
  • Posts: 13524
  • Thanked: 1960 times
  • Bridgeman Downs, Brisbane
Re: ST1300 dash backlight upgrade using kit from LightenUpgrade
« Reply #6 on: December 13, 2020, 05:57:32 PM »
Just "Wow" that it takes so much to get done what I thought would be the simplest part of the job.
How does it work with the needles on the back of the stops?  Does it initialise on power-up my doing an anti-clockwise lap of the dial?  Mine don't move.
My 2005 speedo and tacho stops have the needles both sitting precisely on zero.
For the modern man who lives in the city, riding a bike might be one of the only ways to escape the humdrum monotony. To take off and ride. To be both at one with nature and one with the bike. To feel masculine. Adam Piggott

OzSTOC #16  STOC #6135  FarR #509  IBA #54927
 

Offline CallMeSteve

  • STrudel, Steve and Ruth.
  • Legendary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 582
  • Thanked: 301 times
  • Eatons Hill, Brisbane.
Re: ST1300 dash backlight upgrade using kit from LightenUpgrade
« Reply #7 on: December 13, 2020, 06:14:31 PM »
I sat them against the back of the stops just to get an initial position that seems correct.  Then you spin the needles around to the front side of the stops, and they will rest solidly at '0' when the bike is at rest. 

Basically, the speedo electronics has no idea where the needle is actually pointing.  It just assumes that the needle is attached to the shaft correctly. By pushing the needle onto the shaft at what is effectively a slight 'negative' offset rather than lining it up with '0' I'm causing the speedo to read slightly lower that it would otherwise.

Just maybe, the positioning I used works for all STs, so when you reassemble the dash put the needles on as per my last photo (i.e. resting up against the back of the stops), and see how it goes.  If that proves correct you won’t need to do any messing around. 

Who knows - maybe this simple adjustment can pass as a cheap alternative to a speedo healer.
« Last Edit: December 14, 2020, 01:43:29 PM by CallMeSteve »
A man rides on his STeed, says “Why am I short of attention? Got a short little span of attention”.

You can call me Steve, with apologies to Paul Simon.

 :wht13

current:
ST1300 2014 Police

pre-kids:
CX500
CB900
CB400NB
CB350
1964 Yamaha YG-1 80cc

IBA #76608,  FR #1170
 
The following users thanked this post: ruSTynutz

Offline Shiney

  • Dave
  • Global Moderator
  • UNBELIEVABLE "5000 Posts" Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6117
  • Thanked: 1787 times
  • RTE Coordinator - Strathpine, QLD
Re: ST1300 dash backlight upgrade using kit from LightenUpgrade
« Reply #8 on: December 21, 2020, 08:14:33 AM »
Awesome work mate, I'm going to have to give this a go :thumbsup
My Ride: 2011 ST1300  :wht13
OzSTOC #104   STOC# 8512   IBA # 59142
Find me in The Who's Who of OzSTOC!

I like shiney things :grin
One of the Dave, Dave, Dave and Duncan crew 8)
 

Offline CallMeSteve

  • STrudel, Steve and Ruth.
  • Legendary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 582
  • Thanked: 301 times
  • Eatons Hill, Brisbane.
Re: ST1300 dash backlight upgrade using kit from LightenUpgrade
« Reply #9 on: December 22, 2020, 03:02:12 PM »
Awesome work mate, I'm going to have to give this a go :thumbsup

You’d be very happy with the result. Especially with your love of Shiney things. :beer
A man rides on his STeed, says “Why am I short of attention? Got a short little span of attention”.

You can call me Steve, with apologies to Paul Simon.

 :wht13

current:
ST1300 2014 Police

pre-kids:
CX500
CB900
CB400NB
CB350
1964 Yamaha YG-1 80cc

IBA #76608,  FR #1170
 
The following users thanked this post: Shiney

Offline Biggles

  • NatRally 2018 - Mackay
  • "Top Dog" 10000 club
  • *
  • Posts: 13524
  • Thanked: 1960 times
  • Bridgeman Downs, Brisbane
Re: ST1300 dash backlight upgrade using kit from LightenUpgrade
« Reply #10 on: January 11, 2021, 08:41:11 PM »
I just finished reassembling the bike this arvo having spent my "Lockdown Sunday" replacing the LEDs in my instrument panel and reassembling the bike intermittently during today.
Steve's instructions, in conjuction with the ones that come with the kit, are all you need.
The kit's instructions are actually fairly confusing in the sequence he uses and the terms he uses.  One significant one is where he says to remove the dash dimmer switch.  Fortunately there is only one thing that could be what he's referring to, and it is in fact the headlight up/down knob. In the last paragraph on the first page he says "best to leave the needles directly next to the needle spindle..."  That is a significant error because the first "needles" should read "LEDs".  The reason is, they are red ones which enhance the redness of the needles.  If you do as Steve did, you can, of course, still see the needles at night, but they will be less red, and you've wasted time desoldering and replacing four LEDs very close to the spindle, with the attendant risk of damaging it with the heat.
Steve's video is an excellent tutor for low-experience soldering iron operators.  I can assure you, my results are far less photogenic than his, but all the LEDs work.  I will admit two didn't on the second test cycle, so I replaced them.  It might have been poor soldering, or I might have cooked them while soldering.
I used Steve's idea of initialising the speedo needle to the right of the stop pin but I couldn't see the logic in moving the tacho needle there.  My reasoning is, the speedo was over-reading, but there is no reason to believe the tacho is.  It may be, and you'd need to hook up an engine analyser to find out if it is, but then, who cares?
My test ride with the GPS giving me a fairly accurate speed returned encouraging results.  Whereas 100kph true was displayed as 109, now it shows 105.  Up to 70kph, it is only 1 or 2kph difference.  It's still over-reads, and is therefore conservative, so I shouldn't be booked if I'm riding the correct indicated speed, since I will still be under the true speed as the instrument over-reads as mandated by the ADRs.  Just by a lesser amount.
The panel is so bright I think I'll actually get to use the dimmer of the 3 settings at night.  The pale blue is quite pleasant to the eye, while the yellow never was all that subtle, especially at night.  I'm expecting to be able to remove the digital watch because I should be able to read the time in any light, and tell my long-suffering pillion what the temperature is without needing to do gymnastics with a shading gloved hand.
For the modern man who lives in the city, riding a bike might be one of the only ways to escape the humdrum monotony. To take off and ride. To be both at one with nature and one with the bike. To feel masculine. Adam Piggott

OzSTOC #16  STOC #6135  FarR #509  IBA #54927
 
The following users thanked this post: Shiney, CallMeSteve

Offline Biggles

  • NatRally 2018 - Mackay
  • "Top Dog" 10000 club
  • *
  • Posts: 13524
  • Thanked: 1960 times
  • Bridgeman Downs, Brisbane
Re: ST1300 dash backlight upgrade using kit from LightenUpgrade
« Reply #11 on: January 11, 2021, 08:44:36 PM »
One other thing- you really need to be able to see very fine details. Steve tried a magnifier as per his photo, but advised me it makes depth perception difficult, and that faculty is vital.  I took his advice and wore a pair of those magnifiers you buy for $20 from the chemist over the top of my readering glasses and it brought everything into sharp focus.
For the modern man who lives in the city, riding a bike might be one of the only ways to escape the humdrum monotony. To take off and ride. To be both at one with nature and one with the bike. To feel masculine. Adam Piggott

OzSTOC #16  STOC #6135  FarR #509  IBA #54927
 
The following users thanked this post: CallMeSteve

Offline CallMeSteve

  • STrudel, Steve and Ruth.
  • Legendary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 582
  • Thanked: 301 times
  • Eatons Hill, Brisbane.
Re: ST1300 dash backlight upgrade using kit from LightenUpgrade
« Reply #12 on: January 11, 2021, 09:13:37 PM »
A mighty fine job Sir Biggles.  At the next RTE we will need to park Strudel and Rubina somewhere special where they can be easily admired  ;-*

I'll betcha Shiney won't be able to resist following suit.

Regarding the RED LEDs that you chose to leave as-is ...  you are right, and I didn't notice (or perhaps I just didn't understand) that suggestion on the instructions that came with my kit.  To be clear, I think you are referring to the single RED LED adjacent to the tacho spindle, and also the single RED LED adjacent to the speedo spindle.  Even as fastidious as I am, I can't see myself removing the dash again to rectify this. STrudel will just have to put up with having red needles that 'could have been redder'.
« Last Edit: January 11, 2021, 09:21:03 PM by CallMeSteve »
A man rides on his STeed, says “Why am I short of attention? Got a short little span of attention”.

You can call me Steve, with apologies to Paul Simon.

 :wht13

current:
ST1300 2014 Police

pre-kids:
CX500
CB900
CB400NB
CB350
1964 Yamaha YG-1 80cc

IBA #76608,  FR #1170
 
The following users thanked this post: Biggles, Shiney

Offline Biggles

  • NatRally 2018 - Mackay
  • "Top Dog" 10000 club
  • *
  • Posts: 13524
  • Thanked: 1960 times
  • Bridgeman Downs, Brisbane
Re: ST1300 dash backlight upgrade using kit from LightenUpgrade
« Reply #13 on: January 11, 2021, 11:36:53 PM »
Regarding the RED LEDs that you chose to leave as-is ...  you are right, and I didn't notice (or perhaps I just didn't understand) that suggestion on the instructions that came with my kit.  To be clear, I think you are referring to the single RED LED adjacent to the tacho spindle, and also the single RED LED adjacent to the speedo spindle.  Even as fastidious as I am, I can't see myself removing the dash again to rectify this. STrudel will just have to put up with having red needles that 'could have been redder'.

As a final note on this, interestingly (to those who want to dig into the living brain of their ST) there is a spare pad on the opposite side of each spindle labelled on the PCB, "RED", just like the one opposite it that does have a red LED soldered to it in the factory.  Maybe they discovered it made the needle too bright at night so stopped including it but didn't change the board.  So yes, it's just TWO LEDs, and not 4 as I said in the above post.
For the modern man who lives in the city, riding a bike might be one of the only ways to escape the humdrum monotony. To take off and ride. To be both at one with nature and one with the bike. To feel masculine. Adam Piggott

OzSTOC #16  STOC #6135  FarR #509  IBA #54927
 
The following users thanked this post: CallMeSteve

Offline CallMeSteve

  • STrudel, Steve and Ruth.
  • Legendary Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 582
  • Thanked: 301 times
  • Eatons Hill, Brisbane.
Re: ST1300 dash backlight upgrade using kit from LightenUpgrade
« Reply #14 on: January 12, 2021, 08:04:32 AM »

 Maybe they discovered it made the needle too bright at night so stopped including it but didn't change the board.  So yes, it's just TWO LEDs, and not 4 as I said in the above post.

I suspect that you are right there Bill. Interestingly (or not), my board only has the unused second LED site adjacent to the speedo spindle, but not for the tacho.

I've updated my original post to reflect Bill's findings.
A man rides on his STeed, says “Why am I short of attention? Got a short little span of attention”.

You can call me Steve, with apologies to Paul Simon.

 :wht13

current:
ST1300 2014 Police

pre-kids:
CX500
CB900
CB400NB
CB350
1964 Yamaha YG-1 80cc

IBA #76608,  FR #1170
 
The following users thanked this post: Shiney